4/19/2007

Documentary Film Of The Day - After Innocence...


Everyone has different causes that they feel passionate about. For some, it may be the peace movement and protesting the war. Others want to raise awareness for different diseases and raise money to find cures. As I talked about a little in THIS POST, something I feel very strongly about is compensating those who have been falsely imprisoned for crimes they didn't commit.

After Innocence is a documentary that follows a number of exonerrated prisoners, some of whom sat in prison for twenty years or more for something they never did. It's heartbreaking. The majority of convictions that are overturned with the use of DNA testing turn out to be a result of false eyewitness identifications. I can't even begin to imagine the pain and frustration these men suffered, knowing inside, the entire time, that they got the wrong guy. The most outrageous part is that, once the mistake is discovered and the falsely accused is set free, there is no compensation or programs provided to assist these people. Many were locked up in their teens and now have no training or skills with which to make a living. I think it's a travesty.

If you can, please watch this movie. Notice the grace of these men who, by all accounts, should be bitter as hell. Instead, many of them have dedicated themselves to preventing future mistakes and supporting each other as they readjust to their newfound freedom. It's powerful stuff.

4 comments:

GETkristiLOVE said...

Thanks Chris! Being a Court TV junkie, this looks right up my alley so I Netflixed it. I've seen some American Justice episodes of men that get cleared on DNA years later. It's heartbreaking but at least they did get cleared. The DNA technology is the best thing since sliced bread, especially the mitochondrial. (told ya I'm a junkie)

teri said...

I will watch this one. I hate these situations as well.

Skylers Dad said...

Thanks for the tip Chris, this looks awesome!

Johnny Yen said...

There is such pressure for prosecutors to get convictions-- whether the person actually did the crime means little. I think that one way to deal with it is through the civil courts. If DA's and Judges were held personally liable financially for the false convictions, things would change quickly. Cops, attorneys, physicians, nurses-- and yes, even teachers-- bear that. Why not them?